Welcome

 
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Who's Online

Newest Members

Happy Birthday

Select Theme



Forum Default

Permanently

Author Topic: Tailor on nth straddie.  (Read 3028 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Marburg Muddie

  • Registered
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 0
  • -Receive: 0
  • Posts: 1
Tailor on nth straddie.
« on: Mon 10 Jun 19:16 2019 »
Guys, i have never fished straddie. When do the bream and tailor come in.
Im used to Rainbow Beach years ago

Offline frankiedafisherman

  • Club Member
  • Registered
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 1
  • -Receive: 19
  • Posts: 19
Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
« Reply #1 on: Wed 12 Jun 11:45 2019 »
Havent fished the beaches off straddie for a while now. Used to get a few tailor on the beach along from adder rock early morning incoming tide a s few bream dart.  Along main beach up to the pin plenty of good gutters so id say give it a go there.  I use pillues and always done well with 4 gang rig. Hearing reports that the tailor are starting to run. Good luck muddie

Offline cus

  • Registered
  • Thank You
  • -Given: 112
  • -Receive: 118
  • Posts: 211
Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
« Reply #2 on: Fri 21 Jun 14:32 2019 »
Hey there Marburg Muddie, I reckon they will be thick in July/ August on the beaches. Only problem is the mullet netters will be flogging the beaches from now till September.
Some guys reckon the nets don’t bother tailor. I have other ideas.
  • My Awards Tailor Over 70cm

  • Offline Fanta Pants

    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 0
    • -Receive: 8
    • Posts: 51
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #3 on: Wed 10 Jul 13:14 2019 »
    Firstly Mullet.....
    Plenty of it gets sold locally. If fact I don't know of many seafood outlets that wouldn't be selling mullet at this time of the year. Once all the local markets are full, the remainder of the fish gets exported to many European countries and pacific islands. It is considered a staple food in many parts of the world. If fact the mullet fishery is one of the best in terms of complete utilisation of the resource. The roe and to a lesser extent the melts, get exported as a high value product. Our east coast mullet roe is considered the best in the world in terms of quality which is rightly rewarded. All catches are processed on mass and even all the presumed wastage, including the heads and guts are utilised for bait.

    Tailor.....
    The days of the old cat food theories are long gone and anyone who truly believes this are heavily misguided. There is actually a high local demand for fresh tailor in our area. A lot of it is sold through the multiple Asian markets we have in and around Brisbane. There is also a high demand in southern markets. As a result, the price of tailor has gone through the roof in recent years and quiet often the price exceeds what you would expect to pay for some high quality reef fish (and I'm not even joking when I say that). I doubt the pros are the real reason why your mate couldn't catch any tailor. The professional beach fisherman are all heavily concentrating on mullet this time of the year (with minimal bycatch). Maybe they are just late this year? The mullet season was a good 3 weeks late (likely due to environmental conditions) so I don't see why tailor would be any different. Maybe they're not making it up this far on their annual migration? Maybe their spawning further south than the traditional Fraser Island locality due to adverse environmental conditions in recent years (i.e. warmer water pushing further south)?

    On a side note: there aren't many professional fisherman left who actively chase tailor off our beaches anymore. The 35cm minimum size limit effectively halved their catch. A lot of the early season schooling fish are between 30-35cm rendering them undersize so therefore are not worth shooting.

    The following members said thank you for your post



    Offline rodric

    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 66
    • -Receive: 29
    • Posts: 49
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #4 on: Wed 10 Jul 16:03 2019 »
    Well said,some common sense prevailing !!

    The following members said thank you for your post


    Offline bondy99

    • Club Member
    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 5172
    • -Receive: 2052
    • Posts: 4462
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #5 on: Wed 10 Jul 23:11 2019 »
    Mullet Roe commands a high price for the markets in Saudi Arabia as well as Iran , not as much for mullet melt.

    NSW still has mullet fisherman, (father to son generations). In the not too distant future Australian Salmon will make its way to dinner plate, for those that reckon Australian Salmon are crap tasting, it's obviously the fish has not been processed and prepared correctly. Cottage River Australia had a segment of this on air tonight, showing correct way to prepare and couple of ways to prepare, even sashimi style.

    Bondy
  • My Awards Dolphinfish Over 120cm Whiting Over 40cm Sand crab over 16cm
  • The following members said thank you for your post


    Offline Daryl McPhee

    • Club Member
    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 2358
    • -Receive: 2543
    • Posts: 1271
    • Club Awards:
      2012 Heaviest Bream
      2015 Inshore Champion
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #6 on: Fri 12 Jul 13:37 2019 »
    Here is some up to date scientific information on tailor stocks. I have over 30 years experience now catching tailor and I continue not to have any problems catching tailor when and where I want, and making choices based on the weather and wind conditions at the time.

    I use old methods such as bait spinning which were pioneered by Len Thompson in the 60s. It is no longer a method that the cool kids use much, but it remains effective.

    https://www.fish.gov.au/report/215-Tailor-2018
  • My Awards Whiting Over 40cm
  • It's the Alvey Reel that Fills the Creel

    The following members said thank you for your post


    Offline rodric

    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 66
    • -Receive: 29
    • Posts: 49
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #7 on: Fri 12 Jul 15:32 2019 »
    G'day there Daryl,

    thanks for the informative report,hopefully other members of the group will have time to and make the effort to read the details provided.

    After all these years,good to know we're still catching them !!!!

    Cheers,

    Rod.

    The following members said thank you for your post


    Offline beach bum

    • Club Member
    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 1267
    • -Receive: 836
    • Posts: 956
    • fishing use a lure. Catching take live bait
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #8 on: Sat 13 Jul 15:21 2019 »
    I’m not really sure of your point you complain about pros netting the beach here but happily buy pillies netted by another pro on the other side of Australia???

    In the end the tailor will only be around if there’s bait fish to eat. The seasons are roughly 3 weeks late compared to previous years. And I think the annual run of bait up the coast has been pushed back along with the amount of Rainfall and timing of cyclones all have an effect on if the bait will be there or not.

    But I see guys useing heavy clunky rigs trying to catch a tailor that is usually a chopper of less than a kilo. Try going lighter with your rigs use local bait. You can get pillies that are from Straddie on Straddie if you want to use pillies.
    Looking forward to the next trip

    Offline cus

    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 112
    • -Receive: 118
    • Posts: 211
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #9 on: Sat 13 Jul 15:38 2019 »
    Don’t think scientific papers hold as much weight as they used to.
    Shark control methods is one I’m sure your more then familiar with Daryl!

    If you’ve got skin in the netting game and you want that new v8 cruiser Ute next season your going to fight any of this greeny talk.

    Makes me sick that the female mullet in roe are targeted so people in the Middle East and Europe can grate some yellow *bad word* on their toast.
  • My Awards Tailor Over 70cm

  • Offline Chappie

    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 57
    • -Receive: 3
    • Posts: 17
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #10 on: Wed 17 Jul 14:27 2019 »
    Thanks for the reading material Daryl, can you explain what you mean by bait spinning?  Is it using a pilly or some other bait like you would a lure?  Do you have some more reading material on the technique?
    Cheers Iain

    Offline Da-Jew-Man

    • Club Member
    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 28
    • -Receive: 35
    • Posts: 94
    • Historian/Collector of Sidecast Fishing reels
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #11 on: Wed 17 Jul 16:40 2019 »
    Sorry but I cant help not responding to this article.
    I have fished Northern NSW for nearly 50 years ( apologies not Nth Straddie).
    Yes I can remember fishing for Tailor at Cabba, Hastings, Wooyung in groups almost as large as on Fraser.
    Anyone who has regularly fished these areas will tell you the Tailor caught over the last 3-5 years has dropped off dramatically.
    Come April and the westerlies the netters scour the beaches waiting for the schools of mullet to come up the coast.
    They are so desperate now that they are still there picking of small schools even in July.
    June/ July should be the peak time for tailor in these areas but you will be lucky to get a feed. Also the size has decreased.
    Whilst these netters are allowed to take the food chain from the beaches everything above will suffer.
    Yes mullet is in the shops but how many of you go to a fish shop to buy mullet.
    How many go to buy mullet for crab bait?
    Its a disgrace that this primary food source is treated this way.
    And yes when the netters net the beach it shuts down for up to a week, klms either side of net area.
    Apologies but it is such a shame.

    The following members said thank you for your post



    Offline bondy99

    • Club Member
    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 5172
    • -Receive: 2052
    • Posts: 4462
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #12 on: Wed 17 Jul 22:46 2019 »
    Da-Jew-Man,

    Interesting what you say but quite a few people do purchase mullet from various seafood outlets for consumption as well as for bait, there are quite a few people that don't have boats nor go fishing for one reason or another and quite a lot are not members of any fishing forum. That's life, no such thing as Eutopia. Fisheries Research and Development Corporation would have the statistics as to how much money mullet brings to the economy. Mullet years ago was 20 cents a kg, now its more expensive. The more the demand for a product is, then the greed of sellers come out to capitalise.

    Just like fuel these days.
  • My Awards Dolphinfish Over 120cm Whiting Over 40cm Sand crab over 16cm
  • The following members said thank you for your post


    Offline Chappie

    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 57
    • -Receive: 3
    • Posts: 17
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #13 on: Thu 18 Jul 07:18 2019 »
    Sorry OP still off topic.
    The price rise from 20c / kg 10 or 20 years ago might not just be due to the greed of the sellers, there could be a few other inputs that have increased along the way.
    Also I have never bought mullet or tailor for human consumption.
    As far as figures go for fisheries, I watched a programm about sustainable fisheries by Matthew Evans called Whats the Catch and the take home result for me was that the only sustainable sefood at this point in time in Australia is the pilchard.
    Cheers Iain


    Offline Fanta Pants

    • Registered
    • Thank You
    • -Given: 0
    • -Receive: 8
    • Posts: 51
    Re: Tailor on nth straddie.
    « Reply #14 on: Fri 19 Jul 11:00 2019 »
    TheGurn, I would like to point out a few things which you have stated in your post…..

    "Economic benefit and sustainability are only based on commercial catch data".

    Fisheries Queensland has been monitoring the tailor stock for 20 years. It's a comprehensive monitoring program collecting biological data from multiple strategies. That includes……

    •   Commercial fishing logbooks
    •   Year round boat ramp surveys at 50 of the states most prominent ramps capturing rec effort, catch rates and economic data
    •   State wide rec phone diary surveys
    •   Age, length and sex data from Fraser Island and Gold Coast beach rec surveys during peak season
    •   Age, length and sex data from commercially caught tailor all year round
    •   Keen angler program

    https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/business-priorities/fisheries/monitoring-compliance/monitoring-reporting/commercial-fisheries/species-specific/tailor-monitoring-update-for-fraser-island
    https://www.daf.qld.gov.au/business-priorities/fisheries/monitoring-compliance/monitoring-reporting/commercial-fisheries/species-specific/tailor-biological-monitoring-update

    One of the take home messages here is they are seeing more older fish in the population which is a good sign that the fishery is responding to management methods, albeit it has probably taken a long time to respond. 

    Data collected from all these methods are collated and summarised on a yearly basis to make informative assessments. As we share a stock with NSW, they also reciprocate some of the above data points.
        
    "Falling participation rates in the rec sector are apparently considered a good outcome"?

    Yes, they did fall sharply while fishery management implemented measures such as bag limits and harvest limits. This can be a considered a good thing. This reduction appears to have allowed the stock to recover from a period of heavy fishing pressure in the 1980s. Its an easy to access fishery which has a large rec effort capacity. If stocks were to recover it may encourage an increase in effort like we saw in the 1980s and we run the risk of over-fishing once again.   

    “Netters continue to meet or exceed their expectations”.

    I’m not entirely sure what you mean by this? If they are meeting or exceeding expectations in regards to financial return then this is a positive. The market sets this baseline therefore netters are able to catch less fish for more in return.

    If you’re implying that they continue to meet and exceed expectations in regards to the quantity of fish they catch then you’re off the mark. Their harvest and catch rates have also declined since the 1980s and 1990s. As I said in my previous post, size limit, seasonal and spatial closures have all had an impact on this as well as a reduced biomass. I think people forget that tailor is probably one of our most heavily managed fisheries.   

    Thanks
    Fanta

    The following members said thank you for your post